19 Alerts From the GEORGIA Tag


Tracking Legislative Activity the NMA Way: NMA –E-Newsletter #533

Today we complete the first full calendar quarter of reporting motorist-related activity that is passing through state and federal legislatures. The NMA Bill/Regulation Tracker (Bill Tracker) was introduced in the Winter 2019 issue of Driving Freedoms and went live on Motorists.org in early January when most states began new legislative sessions. Only three months in […]

An Eye on Recent Motorist Rights Court Cases, Part 1: NMA Weekly E-Newsletter #529

Motorist rights cases have made news and even history recently. There have been so many as of late, we are dedicating two separate newsletters to provide some insight on the legal rulings that are affecting drivers around the country. This week’s newsletter focuses on recent rulings and pending US Supreme Court and federal court cases. […]

All Hail more Traffic Congestion: NMA E-Newsletter # 484

The math is simple. More cars on the streets equals more traffic congestion. Ridesharing companies such as Lyft and Uber have tipped that delicate balance between street traffic and transit alternatives. Many city officials are finally taking notice. In a recent Boston survey of 944 rideshare users over four weeks in late 2017, nearly six […]

‘Variable Speed Limits’ allow Police to Trap Motorists on the Fly: NMA E-Newsletter #454

From Joe Cadillic, writer of the massprivatel blog A nightmare driving scenario, is slowly making its way across the country as states everywhere begin installing ‘Variable Speed Limits’ (VSL) which allows law enforcement to change speed limits on a whim. Imagine you are cruising down the highway, obeying the posted speed limit of 75 MPH only […]

How Policing for Profit can lead to a Debtors’ Prisons: NMA E-Newsletter #429

Alexander City, Alabama has agreed to give $680,000 to nearly 200 people who were jailed because they were too poor to pay their court fines. The suit filed in September 2015 by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) claimed that the town ran “a modern-day debtors prison.” Indigent debtors served time in the municipal jail […]