Auto Tech: The Road Trip Had To Get Worse Before It Could Get Better

Here’s the problem with road-tripping in a 2019 model car: You can see the future from here, but you can’t drive it.

Case in point, a drenched night on I-64 in West Virginia. I am hugging the yellow line at the far left side of the fast lane, trying to give an extra-wide berth to the semitruck I’m passing—and I want to pass him fast, because the 18-wheeler is blasting our car with buckets of water. But my car is fighting me. As we round a tight corner, I can feel the Toyota pulling itself the other direction, back toward the semi.

YOU CAN SEE THE FUTURE FROM HERE, BUT YOU CAN’T DRIVE IT.

No, the car doesn’t have a death wish. Its lane-keeping driver-safety aids are simply doing their job, trying to center the vehicle within its lane. But passing a truck in a downpour is the last place you want to feel like your car is trying to override you.