New Study Looks at Motorized Scooter Injuries

More than half of people who received X-rays or CT scans after electric scooter accidents were found to have injuries, most commonly to the upper extremities, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Researchers said the findings underscore the need for more public education on the use of these scooters.

Dockless electric motorized rental scooters, also known as e-scooters, have exploded in popularity in recent years. E-scooters are familiar sights in urban areas and on college campuses, where users value them as an inexpensive, convenient and less strenuous alternative to bicycles.

The rapid growth of rental e-scooters in cities across the U.S. has sparked concerns, as hospital emergency departments have reported a growing number of injuries associated with the vehicles. Earlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in association with Austin Public Health, released a study assessing the potential public health impact of e-scooter use.