NMA Speed Trap Spotlight: Georgia

Georgia speedtrap spotlight

Georgia’s “Super Speeder” law, which adds a $200 surcharge for certain speeding offenses, represents one of the most abusive traffic enforcement policies in the country. Drivers, most from out-of-state, are usually not informed about the extra penalty until they receive the bill in the mail, weeks after they’ve already paid their original fine. By then, it’s too late to do anything. Read firsthand accounts from unsuspecting motorists ensnared by Super Speeder here.

That’s why we turn to Georgia for our next Speed Trap Spotlight: to help motorists protect themselves from this patently unfair and predatory practice. We encourage you to send a link to this blog to those you know who live or travel in Georgia. Remember, an informed driver is a safer driver.

This information comes from the NMA’s National Speed Trap Exchange (http://www.speedtrap.org/), a unique website that gives drivers an opportunity to report on and exchange comments about predatory speed traps they have encountered on their travels.

Five Highest Activity Speed Trap Locations

1.     Lincolnton:           hwy 378 between hudle house and golden pantry

89 Reports             98% Acknowledgement Rate*

“Speed limit changes three times in less than a mile. Beware of this small town.”

2.     Griffin:                 19-41 Expressway

67 Reports             98% Acknowledgement Rate

“When you are going north on Highway 19/41, the speed limit is mostly 55 mph but just before you get to the Ellis Rd. overpass it changes to 45 mph. Cops like to sit up the road a little ways and get the ones who don’t slow down or miss the sign. It’s easy to miss! Be careful in this area.”

3.     Pelham:                 Georgia State 19

55 Reports             100% Acknowledgement Rate

“They love to pull over non-local traffic. Stopped me for doing 61 in a 55 mph zone when I was in-line behind and in front of other traffic (locals apparently) doing the same speed. When questioned, the officer said, “Well it was just you I checked”. Good old boy revenue generation for the city. Last time they will ever see me on the way to the beach…no more gas, food, etc purchased there by me or my sphere of influence.”

4.     Jackson:                Highway 16 on both sides of I-75

54 Reports             98% Acknowledgement Rate

“It’s a four-lane highway but the speed drops to 45 mph from 55mph on both sides of I-75, and the cops are normally setting back off the road right where the speed drops to 45. They have cars stopped on 16 on both sides every time I go by on Hwy 16.”

5.     Norman Park:       US Highway 319

53 Reports             96% Acknowledgement Rate

“This is a very small town without even one red light. The approximately one-mile section located on Hwy 319 results in about 100 tickets per month. A school zone is also located in the section. The cars do have cameras but they may deny that if you ask to see the video. Officers are also wearing microphones. Usually only one officer at a time but occasionally you will find one shooting radar on the north end and then another shooting radar on the south. This is a large source of income for this community. They will also site you for other charges if they can’t get you for speeding—loud music, bright lights, school zone-school bus infractions.”

Ten Georgia Cities with Most Reported Speed Traps (for the Last Five Years) 

Rank

City

State

Number of Speed Traps

Acknowledgement Rate

1

Atlanta

Georgia

38

84%

2

Acworth

Georgia

21

96%

3

Smyrna

Georgia

20

98%

4

Marietta

Georgia

19

86%

5

Abbeville

Georgia

19

100%

6

Snellville

Georgia

18

88%

7

Alpharetta

Georgia

15

86%

8

Sandy   Springs

Georgia

14

90%

9

Johns   Creek

Georgia

14

86%

10

Roswell

Georgia

14

87%

* Acknowledgement rate is the percentage of yes votes to total votes by motorists indicating whether the reported locations, in their opinions, are actually speed traps. Data are available at the links provided.

About The National Speed Trap Exchange

With the development of The National Speed Trap Exchange (http://www.speedtrap.org/) more than 10 years ago, the National Motorists Association pioneered the use of interactive media to alert motorists to potential speed trap activity in their communities. Since then the site has reported on nearly 80,000 speed traps throughout the United States and Canada.

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